Streetlight Manifesto – Theatre Of Living Arts – Philadelphia, PA – 10/2/13

This past Wednesday, and my body is paying for it, I attended the Philadelphia date of Streetlight Manifesto’s The End of the Beginning Tour.  This tour has been marketed as the last full tour Streetlight Manifesto will do in the foreseeable future.  There is the possibility that they will play shows here and there, but a full national tour might not happen.  Who knows though, maybe we might be surprised with a tour in a few years or a new album in a year.

Like any Streetlight Manifesto concert, you can expect high energy not only from the crowd, but from the band themselves.  Going through all their signature songs and new ones, Streetlight Manifesto sounded as good as ever.  For a band that has been beat up by their label, they still play live with a lot of heart.  Victory records may hold the rights to their recordings, but they will never be able to take away their live performance.

During mid set, Thomas played a few songs on acoustic guitar with the band backing him.  The start of these songs was “A Wonderful Life” originally done by Bandits of the Acoustic Revolution.  The mixture of other songs included old and new.  However, once the band started back up with “The Three of Us”, I never seen a crowd burst into a circle pit that went from one wall to the other.  From there on the crowd was a beast not to be messed with till the last note rang out.

I know some people may think that Streetlight Manifesto is like any other band, but they aren’t.  I’ve seen a lot of concerts and the difference between Streetlight Manifesto and other bands is that they play music because they love it.  You might not hear it on the recordings, but in a live setting you can tell Streetlight Manifesto just want to play music.  They don’t even talk in between songs.  It is just song after song until they have nothing else left to play.  If this is the last time we hear and see Streetlight Manifesto, then I must say that just isn’t right.  “The saddest thing in life is wasted talent.”

This past Wednesday, and my body is paying for it, I attended the Philadelphia date of Streetlight Manifesto’s The End of the Beginning Tour.  This tour has been marketed as the last full tour Streetlight Manifesto will do in the foreseeable future.  There is the possibility that they will play shows here and there, but a full national tour might not happen.  Who knows though, maybe we might be surprised with a tour in a few years or a new album in a year.

Like any Streetlight Manifesto concert, you can expect high energy not only from the crowd, but from the band themselves.  Going through all their signature songs and new ones, Streetlight Manifesto sounded as good as ever.  For a band that has been beat up by their label, they still play live with a lot of heart.  Victory records may hold the rights to their recordings, but they will never be able to take away their live performance.

During mid set, Thomas played a few songs on acoustic guitar with the band backing him.  The start of these songs was “A Wonderful Life” originally done by Bandits of the Acoustic Revolution.  The mixture of other songs included old and new.  However, once the band started back up with “The Three of Us”, I never seen a crowd burst into a circle pit that went from one wall to the other.  From there on the crowd was a beast not to be messed with till the last note rang out.

I know some people may think that Streetlight Manifesto is like any other band, but they aren’t.  I’ve seen a lot of concerts and the difference between Streetlight Manifesto and other bands is that they play music because they love it.  You might not hear it on the recordings, but in a live setting you can tell Streetlight Manifesto just want to play music.  They don’t even talk in between songs.  It is just song after song until they have nothing else left to play.  If this is the last time we hear and see Streetlight Manifesto, then I must say that just isn’t right.  “The saddest thing in life is wasted talent.”

This past Wednesday, and my body is paying for it, I attended the Philadelphia date of Streetlight Manifesto’s The End of the Beginning Tour.  This tour has been marketed as the last full tour Streetlight Manifesto will do in the foreseeable future.  There is the possibility that they will play shows here and there, but a full national tour might not happen.  Who knows though, maybe we might be surprised with a tour in a few years or a new album in a year.

Like any Streetlight Manifesto concert, you can expect high energy not only from the crowd, but from the band themselves.  Going through all their signature songs and new ones, Streetlight Manifesto sounded as good as ever.  For a band that has been beat up by their label, they still play live with a lot of heart.  Victory records may hold the rights to their recordings, but they will never be able to take away their live performance.

During mid set, Thomas played a few songs on acoustic guitar with the band backing him.  The start of these songs was “A Wonderful Life” originally done by Bandits of the Acoustic Revolution.  The mixture of other songs included old and new.  However, once the band started back up with “The Three of Us”, I never seen a crowd burst into a circle pit that went from one wall to the other.  From there on the crowd was a beast not to be messed with till the last note rang out.

I know some people may think that Streetlight Manifesto is like any other band, but they aren’t.  I’ve seen a lot of concerts and the difference between Streetlight Manifesto and other bands is that they play music because they love it.  You might not hear it on the recordings, but in a live setting you can tell Streetlight Manifesto just want to play music.  They don’t even talk in between songs.  It is just song after song until they have nothing else left to play.  If this is the last time we hear and see Streetlight Manifesto, then I must say that just isn’t right.  “The saddest thing in life is wasted talent.”

http://streetlightmanifesto.com/

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